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Children

09/21/17 Children #

Parents of Boys Put Greater Priority on College Than Parents of Girls

Parents of Boys Put Greater Priority on College Than Parents of Girls

Just because she’s a girl, I expect my daughter to have to face more problems in life than boys. A lower wage, less encouragement in math and science, and not arguing are some of the things she’ll have to fight through in life.

I have every confidence she’ll beat them all.

I can’t control many of those obstacles. But like many dads who only have daughters, I pick my spots and do what I can.

One thing that I can control is giving her some financial help to afford to go to college. It’s an area that I never expected bias on from parents who only have boys, but it’s one I’m questioning after seeing a recent survey by T. Rowe Price.

It found that the parents of boys are saving more for their kids’ college education than the parents of all girls.

As the father of a daughter, that’s not how it is in our house. Continue reading

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08/21/17 Children , Work # ,

7 Easy Ways for Teens to Make Money

7 Easy Ways for Teens to Make Money

Editor’s note: This post on how to make money as a teen is written by the daughter of the owner of CashSmarter.com.

By Emma Crowe

Growing up, children depend on their parents to feed their bellies, clothe their bodies and give them a roof to sleep under. Although teens require that as well, parents are less likely to provide them with candy, Starbucks drinks, money for the mall, CDs, electronic devices and other unnecessary items.

Parents push their kids to earn their own money to spend on those kind of things. For young teens finding out how you can make money without getting a real job (like working at at fast food restaurants) is difficult. Some want to earn their own money, yet are too young to get real jobs. I’m 13, and am trying to earn my own money.

Here are my top ways for teens to earn their own money:

Make Money by Babysitting

For some teenagers, babysitting is a walk in the park. Playing with kids all day, what could be better? For others, however, it’s annoying and irritating to deal with children’s every demand.

Some requirements for a good babysitter are:

  • CPR certified
  • Likes kids
  • Can cook meals for them
  • Energetic
  • Can handle temper tantrums

Most teen babysitters earn about $7 to $12 per hour, depending on the number of kids.

Advertise your babysitting services using flyers around your neighborhood.

About me: When I babysit, I usually do it when their mother is around, because I am not old enough to babysit them by myself yet.

Mother’s helper

If your child is not quite the age to be babysitting on their own, a mother’s helper is a great alternative. It teaches her or him how to care for a child while also having mom or dad around if anything goes wrong.

Same criteria as a babysitter.

Teens will earn about $3 to $6 an hour.

About me: When I do this, I don’t get paid because I like to do it for free. Continue reading

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11/29/16 Children , Debt # ,

How I’m Trying to Rein Christmas Spending

How I’m Trying to Rein Christmas Spending

Every year around Thanksgiving, I vow to buy fewer Christmas gifts and rein in my Christmas spending. I’m rarely successful.

I try to spend only cash, but that usually doesn’t work and I end up facing a big credit card bill in January. It’s not something I want to do again and again.

Christmas is one of my favorite times of the year, especially with a child (our daughter is now 12) and seeing her light up on Christmas morning as she opens her gifts. But seeing many of her gifts unused a month later always gets me to thinking about how we’ve got to buy her fewer gifts next year. Continue reading

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10/07/16 Children , Work

Taking a Day Off From Work Shouldn’t be a Hassle

Taking a Day Off From Work Shouldn’t be a Hassle

I’ve never been a workaholic. I’m all for getting work done and doing my best at it to give clients excellent stories as a freelance writer and editor. But when it comes time to take a day off from work or the weekend off and relax, I’m ready for the time to re-energize.

That may be one of the reasons why I’m not rich. Or why the three websites I run about personal finances don’t have the awesome readership and advertising numbers that I’m aiming for.

I bring all of this up because of something I heard from one of the keynote speakers at a conference I attended last month for personal finance bloggers. Part of his message was: Take a day off. Or two or even three days off if you can. It was a much better message than what another speaker offered.

After years of working to build his website — which is one of the top PF sites and is among his many successful endeavors — and missing some valuable time with his children so he could grow his business, he came to the conclusion that taking a day off from work each week was important.

This didn’t seem like much of a revelation to me.

But I got the sense that to many of the 500 or more people in the ballroom listening to him, it was an insightful idea worth trying. Continue reading

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08/22/16 Children , Travel , Work # ,

Money Lessons from a Summer Off

Money Lessons from a Summer Off

 

School is back in session in many areas of the country, giving parents everywhere a reason to celebrate the end of summer.

As a freelancer who works from home, I’m about as ecstatic as you can get that my daughter is going back to school — though probably not as much as this guy:

I’m not doing cartwheels yet, or even rolling around on a shopping cart, but not having a child burst into my home office and ask to watch TV, play with the iPod, say how bored she is, or fix herself a sugary snack in the kitchen is enough of a time reward that I can get back to writing for my websites.

I did manage to get some work done for my clients — I tried to work from 9 a.m. to noon on most weekdays during the summer — but now I’m looking forward to writing for my websites after giving them most of the summer off.

It was a fun 10 weeks. We took a few in-state vacations, and I learned a few money lessons along the way: Continue reading

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Hi, I'm Aaron Crowe. Welcome to CashSmarter. I'm a personal finance freelance writer who enjoys spending my money wisely and using minimalism to make my money last longer while increasing income.